CHC2P 10 Canadian History

This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.

Angela · September 4, 2020

Unit Titles

Course ContentUnit Length
Canada and the Great War 1914-191915.7 hrs
Boom to Bust: Canada in the 1920s and 1930s15.7 hrs
Canadians in World War II 1939-194515.7 hrs
Changing Values 1945-196815.7 hrs
Trudeau, Conflicts, and Economic Challenges 1968-198215.7 hrs
Post Cold War Era 1984-200115.7 hrs
Canada, Living in the Post 9-11 Era 2001 – Present15.8 hrs
  Total 110 hrs

Unit Descriptions

Unit 1 – Canada and the Great War – 1914-1919

In this unit students are introduced to the basics of historical inquiry and historical thinking as they explore the events that shaped Canada at the start of the twentieth century through analysis of Primary and Secondary documents related to Indigenous history. Particular attention will be given to how Canada interacted with the international community with a focus on political history. Students will be asked to determine historical significance of events such as Vimy Ridge.

Unit 2 – Boom to Bust: Canada in the 1920s and 1930s

This unit deals with Canadian history in the inter-war decades. Students will investigate the impact of social action during this time, especially as it was found in the emerging middle class and in relation to Residential Schools. Focus in this unit will be on economic and social history. Included in this unit is a financial literacy component. The Historical Thinking Skills Cause and Consequence, and Historical Perspective will be prominent during this unit.

Unit 3 – Canadians in World War II -1939 – 1945

Students will explore the technological and social impacts on Canadian society during World War II. Students will look critically at Canada’s response to minorities at home and abroad during this time period. Examples of people and places especially relevant to the local Ojibway and Cree population including Indigenous responses to World War II will be used to help the Indigenous school population connect to this time period in history, in particular the video-first-hand accounts of Mishkeegogamang and other NAN territory veterans.

Unit 4 – Changing Values 1945 – 1968

This unit explores the changes that took place in Canada in the two decades after World War II. Students use concepts familiar in their own lives such as security and change as the basis for an understanding of Canada’s social, political, and economic changes domestically as well as the connections the country had with the world. The Historical Thinking Skill of Continuity and Change an Historical Significance are highlighted during this time period.

Unit 5 – Trudeau Mania, Conflicts, and Economic Challenges 1968-1982

In this unit, students examine the conflicts and economic challenges that Canadians faced in the period 1968-1983. Examining primary and secondary sources and further developing a variety of historical skills that were introduced in earlier units introduce students introduced to the key events that have shaped modern Canada as we enter the twenty-first century. The Historical Thinking Skills of Continuity and Change and Historical Significance are highlighted during this time period.

Unit 6 – Towards the 21st Century 1983-2001

Students will examine key issues and persons of interest during this time period including NAFTA, Federal-Provincial relations and Environmental issues. Ojibway politician Elijah Harper and the increasing political participation of other First Nations peoples will be examined through the study of the Meech Lake accord. Historical Significance will be prominent in the lessons. Unit 7 – Contemporary Canada: Living in the Post 9-11 Era In this unit, students examine key issues that Canadians have faced from 2001 to the present. Students develop Historical Perspective and deduce Historical Significance to Canadians of international events such as the Sept. 11th 2001 attacks on the World Trade Centers in the United States, and Canada’s role in Afghanistan. Students will examine recent history of First Nations’ relationship within Canada, particularly within the Idle No More movement and Residential School apology.

Overall Curriculum Expectations

Strand A: Historical Inquiry and Skill Development

A1. Use the historical inquiry process and the concepts of historical thinking when investigating aspects of Canadian history since 1914;

A2. Apply in everyday contexts skills developed through historical investigation, and identify some careers in which these skills might be useful.

Strand B: Canada, 1914–1929

B1. Describe some key social, economic, and political events, trends, and developments between 1914 and 1929, and assess their significance for different groups in Canada (Historical Significance; Historical Perspective)

B2. Analyse some key interactions within and between different communities in Canada, and between Canada and the international community, from 1914 to 1929, and how they affected Canadian society and politics (Historical Significance; Cause and Consequence)

B3. Explain how various individuals, organizations, and specific social changes between 1914 and 1929 contributed to the development of identity, citizenship, and heritage in Canada (Continuity and Change; Historical Perspective)

Strand C: Canada, 1929–1945

C1. Describe some key social, economic, and political events, trends, and developments between 1929 and 1945, and assess their impact on different groups in Canada (Cause and Consequence; Historical Perspective)

C2. Analyse some key interactions within and between communities in Canada, and between Canada and the international community, from 1929 to 1945, with a focus on key issues that affected these interactions and changes that resulted from them (Cause and Consequence; Continuity and Change)

C3. Explain how various individuals, groups, and events, including some major international events, contributed to the development of identity, citizenship, and heritage in Canada between 1929 and 1945 (Historical Significance; Historical Perspective)

Strand D: Canada, 1945–1982

D1. Describe some key social, economic, and political events, trends, and developments in Canada between 1945 and 1982, and assess their significance for different groups in Canada (Historical Significance; Continuity and Change)

D2. Analyse some key experiences of and interactions between different communities in Canada, as well as interactions between Canada and the international community, from 1945 to 1982 and the changes that resulted from them (Continuity and Change; Historical Perspective)

D3. Analyse how significant events, individuals, and groups, including Aboriginal peoples, Québécois, and immigrants, contributed to the development of identity, citizenship, and heritage in Canada between 1945 and 1982 (Historical Significance; Cause and Consequence)

Strand E. Canada, 1982 to the Present

E1. Describe some key social, economic, and political events, trends, and developments in Canada from 1982 to the present, and assess their significance for different groups in Canada (Historical Significance; Continuity and Change)

E2. Communities, Conflict, and Cooperation: analyse some significant interactions within and between various communities in Canada, and between Canada and the international community, from 1982 to the present, and how key issues and developments have affected these interactions (Continuity and Change; Historical Perspective)

E3. Identity, Citizenship, and Heritage: analyse how various significant individuals, groups, organizations, and events, both national and international, have contributed to the development of identity, citizenship, and heritage in Canada from 1982 to the present (Historical Significance; Cause and Consequence)

About Instructor

Angela

10 Courses

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Course Includes

  • 7 Lessons
  • 3 Quizzes